Financial Aid Counseling

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Prospective Students and Families

If you are visiting campus and have financial aid or scholarship questions, please visit the admissions office to speak with admissions about incoming student financial aid.

Current Students

You can make an appointment to meet with your Financial Aid counselor using our online scheduling site Navigate. Once logged in, select ‘Get Assistance’ in the right hand corner. Within the assistance portal, select advising, and then select ‘Financial Aid Counseling’ as the service. Then you will select your financial aid counselor and view available appointment and drop-in times.

If your counselor is not available at a time that suits your schedule, you may schedule a time with another available counselor. Drop-in appointments are available with Financial Aid Counselors and Student Services Staff Monday-Friday 8-5pm.

For immediate assistance, you may contact Wildcat Central to speak with a Student Services Professional at (325) 674-2300.

Meet Your Counselors

Rebekah Reyes

Director of Orientation, Financial Counseling and Student Services
Location: 126E
Office: 325-674-4841
Email: red02b@acu.edu

 

John Mark Moudy

Associate Director of Financial Counseling and Student Services (1st Generation/International)
Location: 126E
Office: 325.674.4844
Email: jmm00e@acu.edu

Yulissa Rios

Financial Aid Counselor/Student Services Specialist (A-K)
Location: 126G
Office: 325.674.4845
Email: yxr21a@acu.edu

Austin Ballow

Financial Aid Counselor/Student Services Specialist (L-Z)
Location:126H
Office: 325.674.6739
Email: acb21a@acu.edu

Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

Yes. We recommend that all students file the FAFSA. You can’t assume that you will or will not qualify for aid based on your family income alone. Many factors are considered in calculating need. For priority consideration of certain grants, we recommend completing the FAFSA by December 1.

 

Congress has created a formula that takes a number of factors into consideration. Among them are a family’s total taxable and nontaxable income including the student’s income, family and student assets, the number of persons supported by the family income, the number of dependents in college, and the age and marital status of the parents.

With the exception of the Pell Grant and Federal Direct Loans, funds are awarded to students attending Abilene Christian University. Awards do not transfer from one school to another. Students must reapply at their new college.

The federal need-based formula takes into consideration the household size and number in college (excluding parents) among other factors. Two in college would be reflected in the calculated family contribution for each student. If a parent is attending college half-time or more and working towards a degree or certificate contact Student Financial Services. An additional form is required to consider a parent in the number of family members in college.

First complete the FAFSA with the requested information, then contact the ACU’s Student Financial Services office. There is an additional form that can be completed to explain any special circumstances. Often, projected year income can be considered. These considerations are made at the family’s request and reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

Since so many factors are taken into consideration when determining a student’s eligibility for assistance there is not a specific maximum income threshold for need-based aid. The FAFSA formula determines the family contribution which remains the same from school to school. Need-based eligibility is determined by subtracting the family contribution from the cost of attendance at each institution.

If a student’s parents are divorced, the income data for the parent and stepparent (if any) with whom the student lives is used to calculate eligibility for assistance.

The adjusted gross income is used.

Both asset and income information are collected on the FAFSA. Based on income and household information provided, the federal formula determines what the family can contribute toward educational costs. The family contribution is then subtracted from the cost of attendance to determine need-based eligibility.

Yes. If you are an undergrad and enrolled full time (12 hours).

The rate is half the regular hourly rate.

The consequences of dropping a class depends on the timing during the semester. It is always best to consult with a financial aid representative before making such a decision.

Scholarships  

The federal government requires that scholarships and grants be applied to your eligibility as calculated by the FAFSA. Any additional funding you receive from any source may require an adjustment to your eligibility for federal or state aid. If adjustments are made, you will receive a revised award letter.