Mobile Learning Fellows Research - 2011


Longitudinal Evaluation of a University-Wide Mobile Learning Initiative: (How) Does Ubiquity Matter?

Researcher(s): Brad Crisp, Ph.D.

Email: brad.crisp@acu.edu

Abstract:
Building on prior educational and technology research, this study investigated the degree to which student characteristics (e.g., classification) and perceptions of mobile learning devices (i.e., technology beliefs, attitudes, and intentions) impacted student device selections (i.e., iPhone versus iPod touch), device usage (e.g., academic, social and entertainment frequency), and student outcomes (e.g., student engagement) over time.

Key Findings:
The survey is being administered and will be closed in mid-June. Across all user groups, attitude toward mobile learning devices as well as perceived device impacts are very positive, and academic usage and impact continue to be lower than social and entertainment. Attitude, impact and usage also vary by device with iPhone users responding more favorably. For example, students using iPhone had higher usage levels of the mobile portal than iPod touch users.

Status Report PDF

ACU Connect Summit (2011) Presentation PPT

Related Publications / Presentations 

  • Crisp, C.B. and Williams, M.L., “Mobile Device Selection in Higher Education: iPhone versus iPod touch.” PDF
  • In M.M. Cruz-Cunha and F. Moreira (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Mobility and Computing: Evolving Technologies and Ubiquitous Impacts Computing (pp. 1213-1225). USA: IGI Global, 2011. ACU Connected 2009. Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX. 
  • Mobile Learning 2009; William Rankin and Brad Crisp; Capitol Hilton, Washington DC; 17 February 2009. "ACU Connected: A Campus-Wide Mobile-Learning Initiative."
  • EDUCAUSE 2009; Brad Crisp, Kyle Dickson, Scott Perkins, Cynthia Powell and George Saltsman; Denver CO; 6 November 2009; "Mobile-Learning with iPhone and iPod touch a Year Later."
  • ACU Connected Summit 2009. Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX. 

Other Publications / Presentations by Brad Crisp

 


 

Podcasts as Support for General Science and Biochemistry Laboratories

Researcher(s):

  • Cynthia Powell, Ph.D.
  • Autumn Sutherlin, Ph.D.

Email: powellc@acu.edu, autumn.sutherlin@acu.edu

Abstract:
One of the difficulties in any science laboratory is preparing students to use and understand lab techniques that they have not used previously. Research done in General Chemistry laboratories using mobile devices have shown them to be a good tool for delivering student support during laboratory sessions. To extend this research Biochemistry Laboratory and Pre-service teachers laboratory students were given access to podcasts via iPhone and iPod touch. This study assesses the extent to which podcasts increased students’ independent performance during labs, as well as their achievement on laboratory practical exams.  

Key Findings:  
This pilot project has provided data on the usefulness of podcasts in Biochemisty and General Science laboratories and allowed the researchers to begin the process of integrating mobile devices into the curriculum for the two courses. The two populations have very different Group Assessment of Logical Thinking and Experiences of Teaching and Learning profiles and are enrolled in courses with vastly different curricula, but both groups responded positively to the availability of podcasts teaching laboratory techniques. Future work in this area should include editing and improvement of podcasts based on areas of weakness seen through lab practical scores and on leveraging the advantages of mobile devices for maximum benefit.

Full Report PDF

ACU Connected Summit Presentation PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • Critical Breakthroughs: CCCU International Forum. William Rankin, George Saltsman, and Cynthia Powell; Atlanta GA; 25 February 2010; "ACU Connected: Developing a Campus-Wide Mobile-Learning Initiative at Abilene Christian University." 
  • Podcast Effectiveness as Scaffolding Support for Students Enrolled in First-Semester General Chemistry Laboratory (2010).
  • Podcast Effectiveness as Scaffolding Support for Students Enrolled in First-Semester General Chemistry Laboratory (2010).
  • EDUCAUSE 2009, Brad Crisp, Kyle Dickson, Scott Perkins, Cynthia Powell and George Saltsman; Denver CO; 6 November 2009; "Mobile-Learning with iPhone and iPod touch a Year Later."

Other Publications / Presentations by Cynthia Powell

 


 

Chapter 0: A Student-Created Online Textbook

Researcher(s): Mark Phillips, Ph.D.

Email: mark.phillips@coba.acu.edu

Abstract:
Undergraduate students developed and deployed their own electronic textbook replacements, allowing for enhanced functionality, cost effectiveness and readability on diverse devices. Pedagogical implications of enhanced learning through participation in a significant course experience were also assessed.

Key Findings:

  • A survey of student users found that users rated the electronic text highly on usability, convenience, and value.
  • Allowed students to forego a textbook purchase while still becoming acquainted with terms and concepts.
  • Helped students focus on the most relevant content by eliminating the filler material in the traditional text.
  • Students who completed the project not only became deeply familiar with one particular aspect of the course material, but also developed a much better understanding of the challenges of large project organization and of working in a team.
  • During the following semester this new resource will serve as the sole textbook for the course.

Full Report PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

Other Publications / Presentations:

  • A Campus-Wide Mobile-Learning Initiative at Abilene Christian University. Unites States Army. Abilene, TX, 2010.
  • Mobilizing an Institution: How ACU Funded, Implemented, and Evaluated a Campus-Wide Technology Initiative. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 2010 annual Meeting. Louisville, KY, 2010.
  • Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. EDUCAUSE 2010. Anaheim, CA, 2010.
  • ConnectED Open House. Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, 2001.

 


 

Mobile Jumpstarts in a Calculus Course

Researcher(s): Jason Holland, Ph.D.

Email: jason.holland@acu.edu

Abstract: 
Two mobile learning strategies were utilized to evaluate their effects on student learning and exam achievement in calculus courses. Utilizing the NANO tools section of the myACU website, a “Jumpstart”, a daily mobile question, was employed for the experimental group. Additionally, a series of videos reinforcing the Jump Start were published on iTunesU and made available to the participants. Then items on exams related to the concept explained in the Jumpstart were administered to assess learning for this objective. Material on exams was covered in class for both the control and experimental group.

Key Findings:

  • The experimental section performed better on items similar in concept to the jumpstart than the section that received the control question (this difference was statistically significant only on Test 2, though differences of the other three tests were close to the significance level).
  • Differences in test averages lacked statistical significance.

Full Report PDF

Mobile Jumpstarts in a Calculus Course PPT

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • American Mathematical Society. New Orleans, LA; January 6-9, 2011; Harnessing Mobile Learning.
  • Holland, J. (in progress). Mobile jumpstarts in a calculus course [invited paper]. PRIMUS: Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies.

 


 

Use of Augmented Reality Interfaces to Enhance Art Student Learning: An Experimental Comparison of Learning Platforms

Researcher(s): Kenny Jones, M.F.A.

Email: kdj05d@acu.edu

Abstract: 
Augmented Reality (AR) can be described as layering virtual digital content on top of a real time image, for example as seen through an iPhone. I am interested in exploring whether the AR paradigm can significantly increase learning efficiency and retention as it relates to student perception and their report of what they see. I studied two art classes held in Fall 2010. Both groups were assigned the task to design a piece that would visualize information related to the ACU sculpture, “Jacob’s Dream”, created by Jack Maxwell. One group created an AR interface that would guide visitors in an informational walking tour. The other group created an informative, non-AR pamphlet. Findings from this study were inconclusive as to the AR affect on improvement of perception. This was due to evidence that the classes were too different before the study began. What we have learned is that it is possible to reliably measure this kind of learning, namely, the perception of visual design forms in far transfer artifacts.

Key Findings:
Results of the analysis show that for both near and far transfer artifacts, the focus group scored significantly higher than the comparison, non-AR group. However, while there were significant score differences between the groups on both near and far transfer artifacts, no conclusion can be drawn from the current data due to evidence that the groups were different prior to the first essay. 

These initial conditions could well have been caused by several factors that are not easily controlled (e.g. differences in class time, difference in the classification distribution - with the higher scoring group having more students classified as sophomore or above.) One factor to analyze in the future would be the teacher’s response to the AR group when compared to the non-AR group. Did the study itself create a novelty that subtly engaged the instructor in a deeper way with the AR group when compared to the non-AR group and thus affected student?  

It is possible to reliably measure the kind of learning that is key to both this study and student success in art and design - the perception of visual design forms in far transfer artifacts. Furthermore, this study provides a valuable foundation for extending this research to future experiments, albeit with greater randomization assignments.

Full Report PDF

Mobile Learning Augmented Reality PPT (pending)

 


 

The Efficacy of Mobile Computing Platforms: A Case Study

Researcher(s): John Ehrke, Ph.D.

Email: john.ehrke@acu.edu

Abstract: 
Over the next decade, it is anticipated that mobile learning technologies will significantly impact the future of the graphing calculator platform. The impact of integrated devices (devices which blend productivity, social media, and computing) on educational design in mathematics remains largely unexplored. In this study, we analyze the results of a fall 2010 focused comparison of two sections of a first-year, general education mathematics course. Student performance data and student perceptions of usability are compared across two platforms: the SpaceTime™ mobile computing app and the Texas Instruments™ TI-8x series of graphing calculators. Pedagogical implications of the case study results are viewed and discussed as an integration of action-research within the TPACK framework.

Key Findings:

  • Students were far more likely to encounter battery issues with their iPhone, but this was improved considerably in iPhone 4.
  • A greater number of students forgot their TI calculators over the course of the semester; due to the low sample size this is not statistically significant.
  • Students using the TI calculators reported usability was easier for tasks such as: data entry, sample statistics, linear regression and normal distributions.
  • Performance of the TI-8x series graphing calculator
    • Students are more familiar with the device initially, but this gap closes quickly.
    • Managing graphing windows can be difficult
    • Graphs lack color making it difficult to distinguish graphs.
    • Easier to get help outside of a class environment.
    • Supports more built in commands.
  • Performance of the SpaceTime™ mobile computing app
    • Superior graphics and intuitive control over graphs.
    • No support for multiple functions in the table interface.
    • Small key sizes contribute to increased data entry errors.
    • Catalog allows for quick repeated calculations.
    • Large statistical data sets can be preloaded saving class time.

Full Report PDF

Efficacy of Mobile Computing PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • ACU Connected Summit 2011. Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX 2011.
  • International Conference on Technology in Collegiate Mathematics (ICTCM). Chicago, ILL 2010.

 


 

Optimist iPad 2.0: Rethinking the Rethought Newspaper

Researcher(s): 

  • Brian Burton, Ed.D.
  • Kenneth Pybus, J.D.
  • Susan Lewis, Ed.D.
  • Mike Wiggins, M.F.A.

Email: bgb07a@acu.edu

Abstract:
This study was designed to evaluate the extent to which design, programming and content influence student media usage.

Full Report (pending)

VIDEO: "We Did It!"

  • The Optimist is first to publish on iPad

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, 2011

Other Publications / Presentations:

  • Burton, B. G., Martin, B. N. (2010) Learning in 3D virtual environments: Collaboration and knowledge spirals. Journal of Educational Computing Research, Vol. 43(2) 259-273.
  • Burton, B. G., Martin, B. N., (2010) Collaboration and the use of Mobile Devices, paper, PDF. American Educational Research Association Convention, Denver, CO.
  • Burton, B. G., Mhlanga, F. S. (2010) Experiences and direction in teaching an undergraduate course in mobile computing, presentation, PDF. Southwest Educause Convention. Austin, TX.
  • Burton, B. G., Mhlanga, F.S. (2010) Best practices: Teaching mobile computing: practices & pitfalls, paper, PDF. Ed-Media Conference of AACE, Toronto, ON.
  • Mobilizing an Institution: How ACU Funded, Implemented, and Evaluated a Campus-Wide Technology Initiative. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 2010 annual Meeting. Louisville, KY, 2010.
  • Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. EDUCAUSE 2010. Anaheim, CA, 2010.
  • Ed-Media Conference of AACE. Tornonto, Ontario 2010.
  • American Education Research Association Convention. Denver, CO, 2010.
  • ACU Undergraduate Research Festival. Abilene Christian University. Abilene, TX 2010.
  • ACU Faculty Enrichment presentation. Abilene Christian University. Abilene, TX 2010.
  • Southwest EDUCAUSE Convention. Austin, TX 2010.