Mobile Learning Fellows - 2010


Utilitarian versus Hedonic Uses of Mobile Devices in Higher Education: All Work and No Play Makes...?

Researcher(s): Brad Crisp, Ph.D.

Email: brad.crisp@acu.edu

Abstract:
This research continued a longitudinal study of ACU’s Mobile Learning Initiative. I surveyed incoming freshmen before the school year to collect data on their academic and technology backgrounds as well as factors determining their device selection (i.e., iPhone versus iPod touch). I then surveyed all freshmen and sophomores to capture expectations early in the fall semester as well as usage and outcomes at the end of fall and spring semesters; these surveys considered both utilitarian (e.g., academic) and hedonic (e.g., social and entertainment) purposes for using mobile devices. I also examined students’ hits to ACU’s mobile portal, m.acu.edu. 

Key Findings: 
Fall results largely replicate prior year results. Across all user groups, attitude toward mobile learning devices as well as perceived device impacts are very positive, and academic usage and impact continue to be lower than social and entertainment. Attitude, impact and usage also vary by device with iPhone users responding more favorably. For example,
students with iPhone had higher usage levels of the mobile portal than iPod touch users. 

Mobile Learning Year Two PPT

 


 

The Impact of Mobile Learning Methods on Graduate Student Engagement

Researcher(s): Jaime Goff, Ph.D.

Email: jaime.goff@acu.edu

Abstract:
Podcasting and course blogs were integrated into two courses in the Department of Marriage and Family Therapy: BMFT 610: Premarital & Marital Therapy and BMFT 651: Sexual Therapy. Comparisons on course evaluations will be made between two groups of students: (1) students who took the courses in previous years when mobile learning methods were not used; and (2) students who took the courses that were enhanced with mobile learning methods during the 2009-2010 academic year. The Student Engagement Survey, a shorter version of the National Survey of Student Engagement, will also be used. Student engagement in the class of 2009, who did not participate in mobile learning initiatives, was compared with student engagement in the classes of 2010 and 2011, who did participate in courses using mobile learning. Student engagement was measured at the beginning and end of the 2009-2010 academic year. Through statistical analysis, it was discovered that there was a significant difference in student engagement between students enrolled in courses using mobile learning methods and courses that did not use mobile learning methods.

Key Findings:

  • Fifty-nine percent of students owned a hand-held device with web access, while 41% did not.
  • Of those who owned hand-held web devices, 67% used their device to access the web on a daily basis, 23% used it occasionally, and 10% rarely used their device for web access.
  • Students were asked questions regarding their perceptions of mobile learning methods:
    • 60% reported increased participation
    • 65% reported increased interest
    • 65% reported increased class quality
    • 90% reported the technology was easy to use.
  • Student engagement was reportedly greater in courses employing mobile learning, in four areas: overall engagement, cooperative learning, cognitive level and personal skills.
  • Seventy percent of students reported a desire to use mobile learning methods more frequently in other classes, and 80% said they would prefer more mobile learning in their graduate program.
  • Ninety-five percent of participants reported an overall positive experience, and all participants believed that their classmates had a positive view of mobile learning methods.

Full Report PDF

VIDEO: "Rich Content for Grad Students"

  • Do mobile devices have similar impact among rigors of graduate school?

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • Connected Summit 2010. Abilene Christian University. Abilene, TX 2010.
  • ConnectED Open House. Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX 2010.
  • Connecting Minds: Mobile Learning in MFT Education, San Antonio, TX, Texas Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Jaime D. Goff, Ph.D. & Mathis V. Kennington, MMFT , March 12, 2010
  • The 21st Century Classroom: Mobile Learning in Graduate Education, Washington, DC, American Association of University Professors, Jaime D. Goff, Ph.D., Mathis V. Kennington, MMFT, Scott Perkins, Ph.D., June 12, 2010

Other Publications / Presentations: 

  • The 21st Century Classroom: Mobile Learning in Graduate Education, Washington, DC, American Association of University Professors, Jaime D. Goff, Ph.D., Mathis V. Kennington, MMFT, Scott Perkins, Ph.D., June 12, 2010
  • Connecting Minds: Mobile Learning in MFT Education, San Antonio, TX, Texas Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Jaime D. Goff, Ph.D. & Mathis V. Kennington, MMFT , March 12, 2010
  • A Campus-Wide Mobile-Learning Initiative at Abilene Christian University. Unites States Army. Abilene, TX, 2010
  • Mobilizing an Institution: How ACU Funded, Implemented, and Evaluated a Campus-Wide Technology Initiative. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 2010 annual Meeting. Louisville, KY, 2010.
  • Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. EDUCAUSE 2010. Anaheim, CA, 2010.

 


 

Reconfiguring an Entry Majors Course Utilizing Mobile Learning Tools on Regular (Daily) Basis

Researcher(s): Mark Phillips, Ph.D.

Email: mark.phillips@coba.acu.edu

Abstract:
To date, most of ACU’s connected learning efforts have involved the addition of one or two tools (e.g. clickers, word clouds, blogs) to an existing class. I propose to restructure an existing course from the ground up, incorporating a full array of connected learning techniques. The objective is to create a full-scale laboratory in which numerous tools can be tried and assessed for effectiveness, benefit to students and faculty, and practicality. The end result will be a detailed analysis of each tool, including strengths and weaknesses. Beyond this global assessment, the proposed format also lends itself well to assessing a variety of specific empirical research questions. For example, most existing research on Personal Response Systems (‘clickers’) has looked at students as a homogenous group, leaving questions about individual learning styles and demographic factors unanswered; this proposal could help us understand why clickers may work better for some learning styles than others. Also, students might complete some quizzes electronically and others on paper, providing a comparison for analysis of both their scores and their attitudes toward the two techniques.

Key Findings:
In reviewing the course experience it appears that the connected learning tools offered the least benefit in the administrative area. This failure was due largely to technical problems. As an example, the process of checking attendance was attempted with a wide variety of device-based solutions; between connection problems, device problems, software problems, and user problems, this seemingly simple process never worked reliably enough to replace traditional methods. 

The study also suggests that the greatest benefits could probably be realized in the teaching area. Probably the highlight of the experience was the class session on business history, in which small groups of students used their devices during class to explore, and then explain to the class, pivotal events in business history. While less flashy than the history lesson, the integration of Responseware also offered enormous benefits in tailoring and targeting the course delivery. 

Full Report PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • Mobile Learning Research Report (2009-2010). Reconfiguring an Entry Majors Course Utilizing Mobile Learning Tools on a Regular (Daily) Basis

Other Publications / Presentations:

  • A Campus-Wide Mobile-Learning Initiative at Abilene Christian University. United States Army. Abilene, TX, 2010.
  • Mobilizing an Institution: How ACU Funded, Implemented, and Evaluated a Campus-Wide Technology Initiative. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 2010 annual Meeting. Louisville, KY, 2010.
  • Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. EDUCAUSE 2010. Anaheim, CA, 2010.
  • ConnectED Open House. Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, 2001.

 


 

Using Podcasts on Mobile Devices to Support Increased Student Independence in Inquiry-Based Chemistry Labs

Researcher(s): Cynthia Powell, Ph.D.

Email: powellc@acu.edu

Abstract:
In the Fall 2008 semester I ran a pilot project in our General Chemistry labs. The curriculum was rewritten in an inquiry based format and podcasts were prepared in three categories: chemistry calculations, laboratory techniques and experiment specific information. We have collected and analyzed podcast usage and student/TA interaction data from one "iPhone" section and four "regular" sections during which podcasts were not available. Preliminary results affirm the research hypothesis, but the number of students in iPhone section was small and limited to freshmen, raising questions about the generalizability of the results. This fall a larger portion of the General Chemistry population will have iPhone or iPod touch allowing an even numerical and classification distribution in the experimental and control groups. I will repeat the experiment with the following modifications: 1)TAs will be more thoroughly trained in the categorization of interactions, 2) we will collect interactions for individual student lab teams rather than for the sections as a whole and I will use a multilevel analysis approach in data processing, 3) I will categorize the lab experiments by level of required inquiry and use this information in data analysis and 4) I will revise the types of qualitative data that are collected.

Key Findings: 
The results of this study indicate that when pertinent chemistry laboratory podcasts were made available for students to access on demand as an alternative to a traditional pre- laboratory lecture, student research teams consistently accessed them. The analysis indicates that the student research teams in the podcast group had significantly fewer clarifying interactions with an instructor than student research teams in the lecture group.

Students who used podcasts as an alternative to the laboratory lecture performed at the same level on graded assignments as students who received a lecture. There was one statistically significant interaction effect: students who were classified by the lecture instructors as highly motivated and were part of the podcast treatment group had a significantly higher mean course average than the highly motivated students in the lecture treatment group.

These results are an affirmation that podcasts are a viable option as a support for students in general chemistry laboratories and may be a resource that compliments the scaffolding support provided by instructors.

Full Report PDF

Related Publications/Presentations:

  • Mobile Learning Research Report (2009-2010). Podcast Effectiveness as Scaffolding Support for Students Enrolled in First-Semester General Chemistry Laboratory.

Other publications/presentations by Cynthia Powell

 


 

Monitoring the Behavioral and Academic Progress of At-Risk Elementary Students on a Mobile Device Platform

Researcher(s): Jennifer Shewmaker, Ph.D.

Email: jws02b@acu.edu

Abstract:
The goal of the proposed project is to extend student learning by moving student research team members out of the classroom and into the public schools to work with at-risk children while using iPhone/iPod touch application to enhance their learning through the research team experience. This project is proposed to develop an application for use with iPhone/iPod touch in order to increase the efficiency of collecting data and evaluating progress for children in academic and behavioral intervention programs. This project is aimed at developing an application that can be used across the academic setting for professionals such as school psychologists and diagnostic professionals, as well as ACU student research team members. By the end of the funding period, the investigator expects to develop the application program, including a prototype and materials necessary to implement the application and to pilot the application program in the public school setting in order to test the feasibility of the program and provide data regarding its effectiveness in collecting data and monitoring progress in academic intervention programs. The amount of daily data collected will be compared to the same project run without the application the previous year to obtain information regarding the enhancement of progress monitoring. ACU student research team members will use this data to conduct their own research regarding intervention effectiveness, which they will propose to present at undergraduate research conferences.

Key Findings:
The RTI Mobile application was developed in cooperation with an ACU programmer. This application was developed in order to aid in the ease of collecting data for intervention programs in the school setting. The application contains key features needed by a wide variety of professionals to collect and share student progress in areas targeted for intervention and improvement. A change in federal law requires school districts to measure Response to Intervention before referring children with difficulties for special education evaluation. Due to this, there is a need for easy, effective ways to collect data, manage, and share data. The RTI Mobile application is an answer to this need. The RTI Mobile application is an example of research in action, using mobile technology to change the field of education.

Full Report PDF

Development of an Effective Reading Intervention Program PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • ACU Connected Summit 2011. Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX 2011. “Effect of student response systems on student achievement and study time”.
  • National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention Final Program and Abstract:s. Shewmaker, J.W. Chicago,IL; March 2-6, 2010; “The use of a mobile learning device in progress monitoring for academic and behavior intervention programs”.
  • National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention. Shewmaker, J.W. and Perkins, T.S. Chicago, IL; March 3, 2010; “The Use of Mobile Learning Devices in Intervention Programs”.
  • National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention. Shewmaker, J.W., Carter, C., Gibbs, M., Simpson, E., Wilson, K. Chicago, IL; March 4, 2010; “Effectiveness of a Reading Intervention on Student Reading Skills”.
  • Texas Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention. Shewmaker, J.W. Houston, TX; October 9, 2009; “Development and management of an effective reading intervention program”.

Other Publications / Presentations:

  • Mobilizing an Institution: How ACU Funded, Implemented, and Evaluated a Campus-Wide Technology Initiative. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 2010 annual Meeting. Louisville, KY, 2010.
  • Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. EDUCAUSE 2010. Anaheim, CA, 2010
  • National Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention. Chicago, ILL, March 3, 2010.
  • Texas Association of School Psychologists Annual Convention, Houston, TX October 9, 2009.

 


 

The Use of Clickers and Electronic Flashcards on iPhone/iPod touch in a Chemistry Classroom

Researcher(s): Autumn Sutherlin, Ph.D.

Email: autumn.sutherlin@acu.edu

Abstract:
Student handheld response systems (clickers) in various forms have been used in classrooms in an effort to increase student participation and learning. One of the issues with this technology is that there are many different clickers that are often used in various classes. This requires the students to carry and keep up with many devices. An integrated technology such as iPhone/ iPod touch will allow a uniform technology to be used across campus. This study is a follow-up to two previous studies, which examined the use of clickers in the chemistry classroom. This study will focus on the use of iPhone/ iPod touch as a clicker using TurningPoint ResponseWare and how to best use the devices to improve student achievement. This study will also employ another tool available on iPhone/ iPod touch, Emantras ACUmindwire,which gives the students to opportunity to download pre-made flashcards to use as a study tool for the course.

Key Findings:

  • No statistically significant difference was found between the control group (those who used paper and pencil) and the experimental group (those who used clickers) on three of the four sets of quizzes.
  • A majority (85%) of students reported that using clickers in class helped them learn the material more effectively.
  • Students reported feeling their participation increased in class due to the clickers, with students affirming increased participation at 84% post-survey (vs. 61% pre-survey).
  • 90% of students reported having more time to think and being able to participate more fully in class due to the clickers.
  • The percent of students who found technology to be a distraction in the classroom decreased from 24% in the pre-survey to 7% in the post-survey.

Full Report PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • Podcasts as Support for General Science and Biochemistry Laboratories, Cynthia Powell, Ph.D. & Autumn Sutherlin, Ph.D., 2011.
  • ACU Connected Summit 2010. Teaching & Learning with Mobility/Programming (Panel Discussion), Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, Feb. 8, 2010.
  • Effect of student response systems on student achievement and study time, Denton, TX, Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, Gordon R. Sutherlin and Autumn L. Sutherlin. Aug. 2, 2010
  • Turning Technology Users Conference. October, 2010. Cambridge, MA

Other Publications / Presentations:

  • A Campus-Wide Mobile-Learning Initiative at Abilene Christian University. Unites States Army. Abilene, TX, 2010.
  •  Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. EDUCAUSE 2010. Anaheim, CA, 2010.