Mobile Learning Fellows - 2009


Is it Work or Play? Utilitarian versus Hedonic Uses of Converged Mobile Devices in Higher Education

Researcher(s): Brad Crisp, Ph.D.

Email: brad.crisp@acu.edu

Abstract:
Administered an expectation survey, usage survey, and outcomes survey in both fall and spring semesters that considered both utilitarian (e.g., academic) and hedonic (e.g., social and entertainment) purposes for using mobile devices. Also collected data on students' technology backgrounds, factors determining device selection (i.e., iPhone versus iPod touch), and device specific effects.

Key Findings: 
Major factors in device selection (67% chose an iPhone over an iPod touch) include beliefs about the relative usefulness and enjoyment of the devices as well constraints related to affordability, prior contracts (over 80% of prior AT&T customers chose iPhone), and influence of parents. Extremely positive attitude about devices and the ML program across all students over the course of the academic year. Growing differences between iPhone and iPod touch students over the course of the academic year related to attitude, usage, and perceived impact of the program, with iPhone users reporting a more favorable experience. Social and entertainment purposes surpassed academic purposes for self-reported usage and impact.

Mobile Learning Year One PPT

Related publications/ presentations:

 


 

Collaboration with Mobile Technology at ACU

Researcher(s): Brian Burton, Ed.D.

Email: bgb07a@acu.edu

Abstract: 
Through fall semester of 2008, web hits to m.ACU (ACU mobile, my-mobile, packet guide, maps, and nano tools) were examined. The researcher also surveyed 262 freshmen regarding the frequencies of: 1) text messaging, 2) chat/email/IM, 3) using devices to contact (or being contacted by) others about academic work, 4)providing and/or receiving help from others for academic work, and 5) types of communication with others experienced while working on academic tasks, 6)types of help provided to or received from others using mobile devices.

Key Findings:
The use of technology increased collaboration among college student through the use of mobile devices that enhanced communication, content accessibility, and student self-reliance.

Full Report PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

Other Publications / Presentations:

  • Burton, B. G., Martin, B. N. (2010) Learning in 3D virtual environments: Collaboration and knowledge spirals. Journal of Educational Computing Research, Vol. 43(2) 259-273.
  • American Educational Research Association Convention. Burton, B. G., Martin, B. N.; Denver, CO; 2010; Collaboration and the use of Mobile Devices, paper, PDF.
  • Southwest Educause Convention. Burton, B. G., Mhlanga, F. S; Austin, TX. 2010; Experiences and direction in teaching an undergraduate course in mobile computing, presentation, PDF.
  • Burton, B. G., Mhlanga, F.S. (2010) Best practices: Teaching mobile computing: practices & pitfalls, paper, PDF. Ed-Media Conference of AACE, Toronto, ON.
  • Mobilizing an Institution: How ACU Funded, Implemented, and Evaluated a Campus-Wide Technology Initiative. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 2010 annual Meeting. Louisville, KY, 2010.
  • Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. EDUCAUSE 2010. Anaheim, CA, 2010.
  • Ed-Media Conference of AACE. Tornonto, Ontario 2010.
  • American Education Research Association Convention. Denver, CO, 2010.
  • ACU Undergraduate Research Festival. Abilene Christian University. Abilene, TX 2010.
  • ACU Faculty Enrichment presentation. Abilene Christian University. Abilene, TX 2010.
  • Southwest EDUCAUSE Convention. Austin, TX 2010.

 


 

Student Self-Rated Maturity and Communication Patterns with Friends, Parents, and Teachers

Researcher(s): Matt Dodd, Ph.D.

Email: matt.dodd@acu.edu

Abstract:
The use of an integrated communication device such as iPhone has the potential to increase interaction and efficiency for students. However, just because it's the new technology and has that potential does not mean that we should absolutely use it for our students. At the same time, if we can offer a superior learning experience through the use of iPhone, supported by positive research, then we should use iPhone and other tools to achieve the goal of a superior learning experience.

Specifically, iPhone allows the professor to make telephone calls, send emails, text message, and participate in discussion boards on Blackboard to provide more immediate feedback to students. Students tend to naturally self-select technologies that fit their needs and iPhone includes a large selection of communication methods for the student to interact with professors/instructors.

Key Findings:

  • The results suggest that less mature students are more likely to use a mobile learning device to collaborate with classmates on assignments and activities.
  • More mature students are more likely to use a mobile learning device to interact with professors about coursework, and are more likely to interact and communicate with their parents.
  • Another result from this research suggests that more mature students use their mobile device to communicate with their parents through social networking websites (i.e. Facebook, MySpace, Twitter) significantly more often than the less mature students.

Full Report PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

  • ACU ConnectEd conference. Maturity level and iPhone/iPod touch Usage. Presented at the, Abilene, TX, 27 February, 2009. 
  • Educause Southwest Regional conference. Maturity level and iPhone/iPod touch Usage. Austin, TX, 17 February, 2010

Other Publications / Presentations:

  • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 2010 annual Meeting. Mobilizing an Institution: How ACU Funded, Implemented, and Evaluated a Campus-Wide Technology Initiative. Louisville, KY, 2010.
  • EDUCAUSE 2010. Researching Mobile Learning: Lessons Learned from ACU’s Second Year. Anaheim, CA, 2010.

 


 

Using iPhone to Support Student Learning in Inquiry Based Laboratory Experiments

Researcher(s): Cynthia Powell, Ph.D.

Email: powellc@acu.edu

Abstract:
General chemistry laboratories can be a challenge for students with weak backgrounds in laboratory techniques and calculation methods. We produced brief podcast tutorials that covered essential laboratory topics for our students to access during the laboratory period as needed on iPhone or iPod touch. The podcasts replaced the traditional laboratory lecture in one laboratory section. Data were collected on the types and numbers of interactions between the teaching assistants and students during each inquiry based laboratory session for five different sections. Our data indicate that students used the podcasts frequently and t-test results show that students in iPhone/iPod section had to be redirected or corrected significantly fewer times than students who received the same information in a traditional lab lecture format.

Key Findings:
iPhone/iPod touch students (1 section) slightly outperformed non-device student sections (4) on all 5 academic performance measures which are used in assigning course grades [not statistically significant differences]. Students in iPhone/iPod touch section found multiple additional (unanticipated) uses for their devices in the Chemistry lab environment (flashlight, timer, periodic table, etc.) A number of demographic differences between device and non-device sections were observed (gender, classification, major),but ACT scores were virtually equivalent. Equivalent performance across sections in this highly-successful program of study is seen as a major success in terms of transition to a new learning platform (with a nearly unlimited potential for advancements) with clearly no loss of student performance and content mastery.

Full Report PDF

Related Publications / Presentations:

Other publications/presentations by Cynthia Powell