Connected Talks

Connected Talks 1: Extending Learning in the 21st Century 

Connected Talks 2: Rethinking Textbooks in the 21st Century

Connected Talks 3: Integrating Digital Tools in 21st-Century Education

Conference Prize Giveaway

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Connected Talks 1: Extending Learning in the 21st Century  

The Shift - Technology Trends in a 2.0 World
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Allison Cerra, Vice President, Alcatel-Lucent

Technology adoption is occurring at an unprecedented rate. As a hyperconnected society becomes acculturated to on-demand, multimedia content across any device, the resulting implications to education and commerce are seismic. This session will explore some of the recent technology shifts and what current behaviors could signal about the future of academia and industry.

Allison Cerra is vice president of marketing, communications and public affairs for Alcatel-Lucent in the Americas Region. In this capacity, Cerra oversees marketing strategy and communications and engages with North- and South-American service providers on go-to-market approaches to drive revenue and/or reduce churn. Cerra has more than 15 years of telecommunications experience in marketing, sales and product management functions across service provider and equipment vendor industries. She recently co-authored The Shift: The Evolving Market, Players and Business Models in a 2.0 World, based on an extensive, 18-month primary research study that estimates a $100 billion market opportunity when networks are leveraged as development platforms. 
 

Challenge-Based Learning
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Don Henderson, Senior Manager of Creative Expression for Apple Education, Apple Inc.

Challenge-based learning is a multidisciplinary approach to teaching and learning where students and teachers collaborate to create and implement solutions to authentic challenges. This presentation will introduce the basic principles of challenge-based learning and offer useful information for those interested in pursuing this compelling educational model.

Don Henderson is the senior manager of creative expression for Apple Education. In his role, Don is responsible for creating programs and solutions that integrate Apple technology across the curriculum in both K-12 and higher education. In this role, Don has presented spotlight presentations and led workshops around the world, which focus on the importance of creativity as a part of the learning process.
 

One-to-One Mobile Device Deployment in a School
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Abdul Chohan, Director, Essa Academy (UK)

Essa Academy was the first school in the UK to give an iPod touch to all students and staff as a way of increasing access to information and deepening and expanding learning beyond the classroom. The creativity that that has been inspired by the use of this technology has been amazing. Staff and students are able to have seamless communication that facilitates the development of learning conversations, and the feedback educators are able to provide is not only of a higher quality, but is also powerfully personalized. This session will not only explore the ways that technology has enabled transformation, but will also describe how the integration of technology has contributed to Essa Academy's vision for a new building that has recently begun construction.

Abdul Chohan is a director at Essa Academy, the first school in the UK to give iPod touch devices to all students and staff. The Academy believes in allowing students to access information and deepen learning beyond the classroom. A chemistry teacher for 10 years with a great passion for technology and its integration into learning, Chohan has previously worked for Glaxo Pharmaceuticals as a research analyst.
 

Where's the "Learn This" Button?
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Maria Andersen, Learning Futurist and Math Professor, Muskegon Community College

Learning needs to be more personalized. We all know this. But rarely does anyone describe a practical way actually to accomplish that goal. This presentation will delineate not only how we can (and will) do it, but will up the stakes, arguing that learning could be measured (gasp!) outside of educational institutions, with learners free to gobble up knowledge as they roam the Internet following their changing interests.

Maria Andersen is the learning futurist for The LIFT Institute at Muskegon Community College, as well as a professor of math. She has degrees in biology, chemistry, math, business, and is hoping to defend her Ph.D. in Higher Educational Leadership in March. Andersen's research interests lie in active learning, the study of higher education faculty, interdisciplinary studies, math education, and speculation about the future of education. She writes regularly about education, technology, eLearning, the scholarship of teaching and learning, play, and the future of higher education. Her latest musings can be found at EdgeOfLearning.com.
 

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Connected Talks 2: Rethinking Textbooks in the 21st Century

Your Textbook is a Vinyl Record
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Matt MacInnis, Founder and CEO, Inkling

Ah, the textbook. The very cornerstone of modern learning. Lesson plans, lectures, study sessions and exams often revolve around one - and not without good reason: it's critical that students have trustworthy, consistent information about the topics they're studying. Why, though, must the format be a book? It really oughtn't be. While local pundits rail on about the costs of textbooks, we might consider informing them that we really don't want a textbook at any price. Instead, we want something more effective. Something modular and flexible. Something interactive. Something that's cheaper and better. We wouldn't want vinyl records at a lower price if we could easily have an iPod. So why are we wasting time arguing about the price of something we don't want? In this brief presentation, Matt MacInnis will highlight a handful of constraints that we often inadvertently accept when we talk about "digital textbooks," exploring the opportunities afforded by the iPad that we often miss as a result of these bookish blind spots. The presentation will conclude by showing specific examples of how Inkling takes advantage of iPad in simple ways that make a huge difference to learning.

Matt MacInnis spent eight years at Apple helping educators use technology in the classroom. His time at Apple included two years in Beijing, growing Apple's education business in the region, before returning to Cupertino to help Apple grow the use of iPods and Macs in classrooms around the world. He left Apple in 2009 to start Inkling. With an eye toward redefining expectations for learning content on iPads, he has grown Inkling to what it is today, with major venture backing and relationships with major publishers. A native of Canada, MacInnis holds a bachelor's degree in engineering from Harvard University.
 

OER, Connexions, and the Next Textbook
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Sidney Burrus, Dean of Engineering, Rice University & Member of Connexions Board, Rice University

The current printed textbook is, without question, the primary technology used in education. Along with classroom lectures, homework, laboratory experiments, and examinations, a very mature system for almost all of education has evolved and has served us well for many years. Now, however, we have new digital technologies, which along with new cognitive learning theories, new open-access copyright licenses, new social-network-enabled communities of learners, and a shift of emphasis from teaching to learning, all of which are engendering significant improvements in education. This session will develop the ideas surrounding Open Educational Resources (OER) and will focus on a particular implementation, Connexions, as an example of this new approach in the educational world.

C. Sidney Burrus is the dean of engineering at Rice University. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the AAAS, and has received both the IEEE Kilby Medal and the Rice Alumni Gold Medal. Burrus received his Ph.D. from Stanford and has held visiting positions at MIT and the University of Erlangen in Germany. The Connexions Project started in 1999 at Rice University as a way of applying modern technology to education. It has grown to be one of the most used Open Educational Resources (OER) in the world. Burrus has been closely involved with it since its founding and has lectured and published widely on it.
 

Freeing the Textbook: Building a Sustainable 21st Century Publishing Model
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Jeff Shelstad, Founder and CEO, Flatworld Knowedge

While the disruptive power of the Internet promises wider access to knowledge and new legal licensing structures open the door for enhanced sharing, old business models often stand in the way. How have we arrived at the era of the $200 textbook, with stakeholders so enmeshed in the status quo that they don't seem to question it - even though none of them are being particularly well served? And how can new business models bring disruptive innovation to educational publishing, building a sustainable, new, 21st-century publishing model, based on free and open textbooks, in the process? This paper will explore these questions, offering new perspectives on the future of academic publishing.

Jeff Shelstad is co-founder and CEO of Flat World Knowledge, a venture-backed higher education content company offering world-class, free, and openly-licensed college textbooks. Flat World Knowledge has raised over $25 million in private investment capital since February of 2009, setting out to disrupt the $9+ billion textbook market with its innovative business model. Shelstad brings a more than 23-year record of success in higher education publishing to the venture, having previously held positions in sales, marketing, editorial, and senior management for both McGraw-Hill and Pearson. Most recently, Shelstad served as editorial director of Pearson's Business, Economics, and Computing Division.
 

Between Open Access and Commerce: A Case Study of a Freemium Business Model for Academic and Specialist eBooks
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm Monday, February 28, 2011
Presented by Martin Fröhlich and Felix Hofmann, Co-founders and Managing Directors, PaperC GmbH 

How can we find a balance between Open Access and Commerce, offering free knowledge as well as the possibility of commercial profit for publishers and authors? The founders of PaperC believe that freemium business approaches will be the future of publishing. In this session, they will present a case study of how a freemium model could work to revolutionize the ebook market. One of the central problems of the eBook market is known as the "arrow information paradox": In the fields of information and knowledge, market mechanisms fail because potential customers want to know a product in order to make a purchasing decision. But if this product is itself information, the need for purchasing vanishes once customers know what it contains. Illegal filesharing, which poses a serious threat to publishers, can be considered one of the offsprings of this paradoxal situation. In collaboration with such publishers as O'Reilly, de Gruyter, OECD, and Pearson Education Germany, PaperC is forwarding a freemium model to circumvent this paradox. This model permits users to read full books online completely free of charge, with payments reserved for valuable premium functions: saving or printing pages, copying text with or without citation, highlighting and annotating text selections, and managing their research and books in a dedicated online library. Through granting customers the choice to decide what proportion of the product they want to purchase, PaperC and similar freemium models could help diminish illegal file-sharing and enhance access to knowledge.

Martin Fröhlich is a managing director of PaperC, responsible for marketing and cooperations. He has a master's degree in marketing and international management from the Berlin School of Economics and Law. Along with Felix Hofmann and Lukas Rieder, Fröhlich co-founded PaperC in 2008. The idea for PaperC emerged when Hofmann was writing his final thesis and regularly lugged heavy books between Berlin, Germany and St Gallen, Switzerland. As no online library specialising in technical and academic texts existed, the three entrepreneurs developed PaperC to provide readers access not only to selected pages, but to entire books, for free. PaperC's vision is to make knowledge freely accessible to users while creating a business model equally beneficial to publishers and authors.

Felix Hofmann is the managing director for strategy and finance of PaperC. He is pursuing a masters degree in technology management at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland and he holds a master's degree in business administration (entrepreneurship) from the Berlin School of Economics and Law. Along with Martin Fröhlich and Lukas Rieder, Hofmann co-founded PaperC in 2008 after recognizing the need for a robust electronic research library while lugging heavy books between Berlin, Germany and St Gallen, Switzerland. As no online library specialising in technical and academic texts existed, he and his colleagues developed PaperC to provide readers access to entire books, for free, with the added benefit that the freemium model they developed can help to fight online piracy. PaperC's vision is to make knowledge freely accessible to users while creating a business model equally beneficial to publishers and authors.
 

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Connected Talks 3: Integrating Digital Tools in 21st-Century Education

Reaching All Learners: Apple Technology for Special Needs
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Tuesday, March 1, 2011
Presented by Sarah Herrlinger, Senior Manager, Education, Apple, Inc.

For more than 25 years, Apple has provided new and innovative solutions for people with disabilities, allowing them to access - and enjoy using - the Mac, iPod, iPhone, iPad and Apple TV. Apple includes assistive technology in its products as a standard feature - at no additional cost. During this session, Sarah Herrlinger, a senior manager at Apple who speaks powerfully about the importance of universal access in education, will explore the ways that Apple has implemented accessibility features into its iOS devices.

Sarah Herrlinger is a senior marketing manager in Apple's education division and a seven year veteran of Apple, Inc. After three years as a senior product marketing manager in Apple's consumer applications division, Sarah joined Apple's education team to focus on special education. She currently manages Apple's Special Education and Accessibility marketing efforts. In this role, Sarah collaborates with special education leaders to create resource materials such as the Apple Technology for Diverse Learners Guide and works with product teams to ensure that Apple products continue to meet the needs of all students.
 

The End of the IT Department?
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Tuesday, March 1, 2011
Presented by Fraser Speirs, Head of Computing and IT, Cedars School of Excellence (Scotland)

There was a time when the first question a geek asked the owner of a newly-broken computer was "have you installed any new software recently?" As the post-PC era rolls in - and as the iOS App Store has given consumers confidence that installing software can, under no circumstances, break their computer - that question is changing. But this raises an important new question: why do we "manage" traditional computers in an organization and do those same rationales apply to the new generation of mobile devices that is replacing them? There may be good reasons to manage desktop-class computers tightly, but in an era when mobile devices come with their own managed App Stores, is this still necessary? This talk will explore the idea that the broad changes we're seeing in smartphone platforms and the associated change in attitudes toward exploring their full capabilities should be allowed and even encouraged in schools.

Fraser Speirs is the head of computing and IT at Cedars School of Excellence in Greenock, Scotland. He is responsible for the teaching of computing and ICT across the school and is also responsible for IT provision, policy and strategy. In August 2010 at Cedars, Speirs successfully led the world's first one-to-one deployment of iPads in a whole-school setting. Speirs holds a B.Sc. in Software Engineering and a master's in computer science from the University of Glasgow.
 

The Open Content Revolution
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Tuesday, March 1, 2011
Presented by Matt Federoff, Chief Information Officer, Vail Unified School District (Arizona)

After two decades, the World-Wide-Web is really starting to deliver on the promise of readily available, high-quality content for nearly every subject imaginable. Nearly all of this content is free, and is therefore "open content" ready to be used, modified, and shared again. With such a vast repository of content available, we need to come up with ways to index and share it that are meaningful to educators and address their specific goals. If these needs can be met, schools can leave expensive textbooks behind and move towards the future of Open Content.

Matt Federoff, chief information officer for the Vail, Arizona School District, led one of the nation's early efforts to connect schools using wireless technology, later providing wireless access at each school site in the district. In 2005, he led the opening of Empire High School, called the first textbook-free school in the United States. As part of Empire's initiative, all students are issued laptops, and technology helps form the core of their learning experience, much of which is self-directed. He was named the 2005 Arizona Technology Director of the Year and is currently involved in the Beyond Textbooks Initiative, extending the Empire methodology across all grade levels. In 2007, Federoff was named one of the NSBA's "20 to Watch." He lives with his wife and children in the wilds of the Empire Mountains south of Vail.
 

Turning the Page: The Next Chapter in Education
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Tuesday, March 1, 2011
Presented by William Rankin, Ph.D., Director of Educational Innovation, Abilene Christian University

In this wrap-up of overall conference themes, Bill Rankin will offer a vision for how mobility, mobile media and mobile content creation, and next-generation digital resources are transforming education. As mobile devices become increasingly powerful and as they offer new forms of creativity and connectivity, we're seeing an exciting, and sometimes dizzying, array of pedagogies and educational opportunities emerge. These new models are challenging educators throughout K-12 and higher education to rethink teaching and learning, considering a new trajectory for student engagement. Challenging attendees to implement changes in their own institutions, this session will synthesize some of the key insights and conclusions offered by speakers at this year's Connected Summit.

William Rankin is an associate professor of English and Director of Educational Innovation at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, Texas. Working with colleagues, he helped design the initiative that became ACU Connected, ACU's pioneering one-to-one that gave every student an iPhone or iPod touch as a platform for exploring next-wave mobile learning. As part of this initiative, Rankin has worked on everything from defining pedagogical approaches to designing interface elements, and he continues to work to discover and create new ways to engage learners through emerging technologies. With more than 20 years of experience in higher education, Rankin has received numerous awards for teaching and has presented on the implications of mobility and emerging educational technologies throughout the world. In 2009, he was named an Apple Distinguished Educator and in 2010, he was named to Apple's ADE Board of Directors. Interviews with Rankin have appeared in such periodicals as Wired, The Guardian, The Australian, and The Chronicle for Higher Education, and at online sites including InsideHigherEd, TUAW, and Open Culture.
 

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Conference Prize Giveaway

5:00 pm Tuesday, March 1, 2011
Presented by Grant Boone, ACU Connected Summit Emcee, ACU Connected Summit

All registered conference attendees are eligible for the prize drawings. Registrants must be present to win.

 


 

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The State of Mobile Learning
Students using iPhones in classroom discussion
So much about the way we teach, learn and communicate is up for grabs. Educators are using new tools and technologies to reach their students - but what does the future hold?
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