Communication

Joe Cardot, Chair
ACU Box 28156
Abilene, Texas 79699-8156
Sherrod Building – Don Morris Center,
Room 128

Phone: 325-674-2136
Fax: 325-674-6966
Email: cardotj@acu.edu
Web: www.acu.edu/comm 

Faculty
Jonathan Camp, Associate Professor
Joe Cardot, Professor
Dena Counts, Instructor
Kristina Davis, Assistant Professor
Carley Dodd, Professor
Paul Lakey, Professor
Suzanne Macaluso, Assistant Professor (Sociology)
Lauren Smith Lemley, Assistant Professor
Cynthia Roper, Associate Professor
Lynette Sharp Penya, Associate Professor
J.D. Wallace, Professor

Majors: Communication (BA)               
               Communication (BS)
              Sociology (BS)

Minor:   Communication
               Sociology

The Communication Program offers both Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in communication. A minor in communication may be added to other majors.

The Master of Arts degree in communication is available. The interdisciplinary Master of Science degree in organizational development (OD) combining business, conflict resolution and communication is available and coordinated by the department. See the Graduate School section of this catalog. 

Introduction
The Department of Communication recognizes the increasingly vital role of communication in modern society. Communication permeates all social, corporate, civic, educational and religious situations, and the demand for individuals skilled in its use continues to grow. A basic course in communication is required for most degrees at ACU.

Instructional facilities are located in the Sherrod Building of the Don Morris Center and include well-equipped classrooms, digital recording equipment, multimedia presentation equipment and access to computers. Highly-qualified Christian faculty, many known nationally and internationally, are dedicated to teaching, research and helpful interaction with their students.

The department staffs and operates the ACU Speaking Center housed in the campus library. It provides expertise in all aspects of the creation and delivery of presentations. The services are available to all students, faculty, staff, and community members who may require assistance.

The focus of communication is on information management and interaction. Students successfully completing a major in communication prepare themselves for a variety of careers where people and information come together. It also provides preparatory training for law school, public relations, human resources, sales, management, government work and many other fields that require competence in information management and human interaction.

Graduates are especially prepared in such essential areas as team building, the analysis and organization of information, and critical thinking. Communication graduates are successful in careers as diverse as business, ministry, training, insurance, and social and government service.

The program also prepares students who plan to do graduate work in communication and become college communication/speech teachers. Students interested in pulpit ministry should see the College of Biblical Studies for a degree in Christian ministry.

Study Abroad Expectations
All students are encouraged to participate in ACU’s Study Abroad program. Classes offered at Study Abroad sites vary depending on the site. Academic advisors can assist students in planning ahead for their Study Abroad experience and should be consulted during the freshman year.

Admission Requirements
Before being admitted to the program in communication, a student must satisfy the requirements listed in the ACT/SAT Placement Information section of this catalog.

 

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COMMUNICATION (BA)  

BA: COMMUNICATION DEGREE PLAN (COMS)  
UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS  
Please see the University Requirements section of this catalog. 
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS  

Communication

    COMS 222 Discussion, Dissent, and Debate

    COMS 236 General Communication Theory

    COMS 331 Small Group Communication

    COMS 345 Intercultural Communication

    COMS 421 Leadership and Communication

    COMS 483 Advanced Public Speaking

    COMS 491 Rhetorical Theory (writing-intensive course)

    COMS 499 Communication Internship (capstone course)

Area of Emphasis (recommended)

Selected from one communication track:

    Leadership in Organizations: COMS 343, 383, 384,  408, 430, 485, 486

    Relationships in Community: COMS 341, 376, 407, 430, 436, 450

    Social Influence in a Globalized World: COMS 375, 383, 415,

        436, 440, plus 3 hours advanced COMS

TOTAL

 

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

 

 

18

18

 

18

42

SUPPLEMENT FOR MAJOR  

English

    Sophomore Literature

Foreign Language

    FLFR, FLGE, FLLA, or FLSP 221, 222

TOTAL

 

3

 

6

9

ELECTIVES  

Recommended minors:

    Intercultural track: business, missions, psychology

    Interpersonal track: Bible, English, psychology, sociology

    Organizational track: business, digital media, integrated marketing 
    communication

    Public and corporate advocacy track: business, integrated marketing
    communication

Minimum

 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 21

TOTAL MAJOR HOURS 72
OTHER GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS  

Minimum grade for each course in major

Minimum GPA for graduation

Minimum advanced hours

Minimum total hours

Courses numbered 0* * do not count in
minimum hours required for degree.

C

2.00

33

128

 

COMMUNICATION(BS)  

BS: COMMUNICATION DEGREE PLAN (COMS)  
UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS  

Please see the University Requirements section of this catalog.

 
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS  

 Communication

    COMS 222 Discussion, Dissent, and Debate 

    COMS 236 General Communication Theory  

    COMS 331 Small Group Communication  

    COMS 345 Intercultural Communication 

    COMS 421 Leadership and Communication 

    COMS 483 Advanced Public Speaking  

    COMS 491 Rhetorical Theory (writing-intensive course)  

    COMS 499 Communication Internship (capstone course)  

Area of Emphasis (recommended)

Selected from one communication track:

    Leadership in Organizations: COMS 343, 383, 384, 408, 430, 485, 486 

    Relationships in Community: COMS 341, 376, 407, 430, 436, 450 

    Social Influence in a Globalized World: COMS 375, 383, 415, 436, 440

          plus 3 hours advanced COMS 

TOTAL  

 

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

 

 

18

18

 

18

 42

SUPPLEMENT FOR MAJOR  

One Research Tool

    Choose from: IS 322; SOCI 415; PSYC 311  

TOTAL  

 

3

3

ELECTIVES  
Minimum   27
TOTAL MAJOR HOURS 72
OTHER GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS  

Minimum grade for each course in major  

Minimum GPA for graduation  

Minimum advanced hours  

Minimum total hours  

Courses numbered 0** do not count in
minimum hours required for degree.

 

C

2.00

33

128

  Minor in Communication 
 

MINOR: COMMUNICATION (COMS)  

COMS 211 Intermediate Speech and Rhetoric 

COMS 100-499  

COMS 300-499  

TOTAL  

3

3

12

18

 

Sociology

Suzanne Macaluso, Director
ACU Box 27890
Abilene, Texas 79699-7890
Hardin Administration Building, Room 110

Phone: 325-674-2702
Fax: 325-674-6525
Email: suzie.macaluso@acu.edu
Web: www.acu.edu/soci.html

Faculty
Suzanne Macaluso, Assistant Professor

Majors:  Sociology (BS)

Minors: Sociology

 

The Sociology Program offers the Bachelor of Science degree in sociology. A minor in sociology may be added to other majors. The college also offers a certificate program in gerontology (see the Gerontology Program section of this catalog (page 134)).

Introduction
The Sociology Program builds upon the University’s mission to educate students for Christian service and leadership by equipping students to address contemporary social issues in a variety of community settings.

The program is committed to attaining high standards in education while offering personal guidance to students regarding their life choices.

Study Abroad Expectations
All students are encouraged to participate in ACU’s Study Abroad program. Classes offered at Study Abroad sites vary depending on the site. Academic advisors can assist students in planning ahead for their Study Abroad experience and should be consulted during the freshman year.

Bachelor of Science Degree (BS)

Admission Requirements
Before being admitted to this program, a student must satisfy the requirements listed in the ACT/SAT Placement Information section of this catalog (page 20). 

Sociology

The primary goal of the sociology program is to provide a quality educational experience within a Christian, liberal arts perspective. Students will be prepared to assume entry level careers of service and leadership in communities or continue graduate studies in related fields of study.

Sociology is devoted to understanding our social world – how and why it is changing and how to make it better. Its primary subject matter is the group, not the individual. Sociology attempts to give people an insight into intergroup relationships at work, in the family, the church, the community and the world. Since all human activity is social, our subject matter ranges from family relationships to mob violence, from religion to organized crime, from divisions over gender, race and social class to consensus on basic values, from the sociology of work to the sociology of sports. In fact, few fields of study have such a global scope and relevance for so many applications.

Because sociology offers special training in a broad range of social issues and competency in gathering, organizing and evaluating data, a degree in sociology helps open numerous job opportunities in our information-oriented society. At the baccalaureate level, sociology majors acquire positions in such diverse occupational settings as social service agencies, management, criminal justice, community research, gerontology, public relations, medical facilities, church ministries, case workers, lobbyists, community planning, public school teaching, legal offices, public/social policy, and numerous others.

Many undergraduates in sociology pursue their master’s and doctorates in specialized fields of sociology. Others use their sociology training in diverse graduate fields such as community studies and development, family therapy, social work, urban planning, church ministry and missions. Sociology also provides excellent preparation for law school by exposing students to critical thinking and research skills, interpersonal and organizational dynamics, and social policy issues.

SOCIOLOGY (BS)       
    

 BS: SOCIOLOGY DEGREE PLAN (SOCI)  
UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 
Please see the University Requirements section of this catalog.  
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS  

Sociology

    SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology

    SOCI 385 Social Theory (writing-intensive course)

    SOCI 415 Social Research (writing-intensive course)

    SOCI 416 Social Statistics

    SOCI 498 Sociological Practice I

    BIBP 486 Ethics

    Choose eight from: ECON 438, PSYC 370, SOCW 329, SOCI 350

    SOCI 355, SOCI 362, SOCI 380, SOCI 388, SOCI 410, SOCI 477.

    SOCI 480

TOTAL  

 

(3)1

3

3

3

3

(3)1

 

 

24

36

ELECTIVES  
Minimum      36
TOTAL MAJOR HOURS    72
OTHER GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS  

Minimum grade for each course in major  

Minimum GPA in major  

Minimum GPA for graduation   

Minimum advanced hours   

Minimum total hours 

Courses numbered 0** do not count in

minimum hours required for degree.

C

2.25

2.00

33

128

 

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MINOR: SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)  

    SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology  

    SOCI 385 Social Theory

    SOCI 415 Social Research (writing-intensive course)

    Choose from: SOCI 300-499

TOTAL

               3

3

3

9

18

 

 

CERTIFICATE IN GERONTOLOGY (BS)      

The undergraduate Certificate of Studies in Gerontology requires 15 semester hours. See the Gerontology section in Interdisciplinary Programs for specific requirements.

Course Descriptions

Please see the Course Descriptions section of this catalog. Courses offered by the Department of Communication and Sociology include those with the following designations: COMS, FAM, GERO, SOCI.

  

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