2011-12 Course Descriptions

   PSYC - Psychology
Department of Psychology (CAS)
   

PSYC 100 Discovery: Career and Life Planning (1-0-1), fall, spring. Designed to help students discover their gifts in pursuit of their career and calling. Focuses on self-assessment, conducting occupational research, networking, and informational interviewing. Speakers from various professions and alumni will provide information about careers and integrating faith with their career.   

PSYC 120 Introduction to Psychology (3-0-3), fall, spring, summer. A comprehensive survey of the science of psychology emphasizing human behavior. May be used to satisfy University Requirement.   

PSYC 201 Psychology Seminar (1-0-1), fall, spring. Introduction to the training and career opportunities in psychology; strategies for studying psychology. Relation to Christian beliefs to the study of psychology. To be taken in the first semester of the psychology major. Fifty hours of community experience in an approved setting is required.   

PSYC 232 Developmental Psychology (3-0-3), fall, spring. A survey of the biological, cognitive, moral, and psycho-social development of the individual from conception through death.   

PSYC 233 Physiological Psychology (3-0-3), fall, spring. Special emphasis on the nervous system, brain and behavior, neuroanatomy, genetics, neurological basis of learning, cognition, sensation, memory, motivation, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisites: BIOL 112/113 or 120 or 203.   

PSYC 241 Cognition and Learning (3-0-3), fall, spring, summer. Includes the fundamentals of perception, learning, memory, cognition, and intelligence.   

PSYC 278 Stress and Its Management (3-0-3), spring, summer. The impact of stress on physical and emotional health; survey and practice of stress management methods.   

PSYC 301 Psychology Seminar II (1-4*-1), fall, spring. Discussion of personal, professional, and Christian ethics in psychology. Application of psychological knowledge to contemporary social issues. *Either 50 hours of approved community experience or a social issue paper is required.   

PSYC 305 Peacemaking (3-0-3), fall, odd years. Prepares students to recognize, analyze, and act to prevent or stop destructive conflict and transform it into social change that is just and that meets human needs. Prerequisites: ENGL 111 or equivalent and university required COMS.   

PSYC 311 Elementary Statistics (3-0-3), fall, spring, summer. Introduction to basic formulas, methods, and interpretations of statistical measures, both descriptive and inferential. Prerequisite: Completion of university mathematics requirement.   

PSYC 342 Applied Sports Psychology (3-0-3), fall. Development of knowledge and skill in the application of psychology to the enhancement of sport and exercise performance and to the personal development of the athlete.   

PSYC 351 Experimental Psychology (3-2-4), fall, spring. A survey of experimental methods employed in the study of human behavior. Special attention is given to the sensory systems, perception, and learning. Required laboratory is graded with the course. Prerequisite: PSYC 368.   

PSYC 368 Psychological Tests and Measurements (3-0-3), fall, spring. A study of the principles of psychological measurement including scale development and evaluation. An overview of the major assessment instruments in each area of psychological testing. Prerequisite: Completion of university mathematics requirement.   

PSYC 370 Social Psychology (3-0-3), fall, spring, summer. A study of the processes of intersocial stimulation and their consequences. Prerequisite: PSYC 120 or SOCI 111.   

PSYC 372 Child Abuse: Recognition and Response (3-0-3), fall. Focuses on identification, reporting, intervention, and prevention of child sexual abuse, physical abuse, and neglect. Special attention will be given to the roles of different disciplines including nursing, social work, education, and psychology. Prerequisite: junior standing.   

PSYC 373 Characteristics and Needs of Exceptional Children
(3-0-3), fall. A survey of the nature and needs of exceptional children, such as the mentally retarded, gifted, and emotionally disturbed.   

PSYC 374 Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Children (3-0-3), spring. A study of social and emotional problems in children and adolescents including intervention and prevention strategies. Same as SPED 374.   

PSYC 376 Psychology of Mental Retardation (3-0-3), fall.
The nature and characteristics of mental retardation and its social, emotional, and cognitive aspects.   

PSYC 382 Abnormal Psychology (3-0-3), fall, spring, summer. A study of the types of psychopathologies, their causes, and accepted methods of treatment.   

PSYC 388 Teams and Team Leadership (3-0-3), fall. Analysis of the factors contributing to the success of teams in complex organizations; focusing on team selection, development, training, and evaluation. Students will develop skills through team building, and by leading in simulations and team projects.   

PSYC 392 Child Psychology (3-0-3), fall. An advanced course in the study of children and adolescents, including physical, emotional, cognitive, moral, and social development.   

PSYC 401 Psychology Seminar III (1-4*-1), fall, spring. Detailed study of graduate school admissions and job search strategies including school selection, personal skills assessment, resume writing, and interviewing. To be taken in the junior year. *Fifty hours of approved community experience or other approved experience is required.   

PSYC 451 Statistics in Psychological Research (3-0-3), fall. Basic formulas, methods and interpretations of statistical measures, both descriptive and inferential. Special emphasis placed on the integration of statistics and experimental design in psychological research. Provides extensive training in SPSS software skills for data analysis and display. Prerequisite: PSYC 351.   

PSYC 471 Behavior Modification (3-0-3), on demand. An introduction to behavior and cognitive-behavior therapy. Major topics include learning foundations and theoretical bases. Therapy techniques, applications to specific clinical problems, prominent research, and ethics are also considered. Prerequisites: PSYC 241, 12 hours of psychology.   

PSYC 485 Introduction to Counseling (3-2-4), fall, spring. Introduction to theory and practice of counseling. Emphasis is on the development of essential attending, interviewing, and influencing skills. Course requires a lab. Laboratory graded and credited with course. Prerequisite: PSYC 382.   

PSYC 487 Theories of Personality (3-0-3), on demand. Personality theories, their historical development, concepts, issues, and methods of research, assessment, and treatment that are essential for preparation for professional areas of applied psychology. Prerequisite: 15 hours of psychology or consent of advisor.   

PSYC 493 History of Theories in Psychology (3-0-3), fall, spring. Survey of major psychological theories and systems and an overview of the history of psychology with an emphasis on modern history. A writing-intensive course. Prerequisites: psychology major or minor and 12 hours of psychology.   

PSYC 499 Senior Project and Seminar (1-6-3), on demand. Observation, experience, and research in a specific area. Each student will be required to attend a weekly seminar. Guest speakers and ACU faculty will address professional issues. May be repeated.   

PSYC 511 Elementary Statistics (3-0-3), fall, spring, summer. Introduction to basic formulas, methods, and interpretations of statistical measures, both descriptive and inferential.   

PSYC 542 Applied Sports Psychology (3-0-3), fall. Development of knowledge and skill in the application of psychology to the enhancement of sport and exercise performance and to the personal development of the athlete.   

PSYC 571 Behavior Modification (3-0-3), on demand. An introduction to behavior and cognitive-behavior therapy. Major topics include learning foundations and theoretical bases. Therapy techniques, applications to specific clinical problems, prominent research, and ethics are also considered.   

PSYC 572 Child Abuse: Recognition and Response (3-0-3), fall. Focuses on identification, reporting, intervention, and prevention of child sexual abuse, physical abuse, and neglect. Special attention will be given to the roles of different disciplines including nursing, social work, education, and psychology.   

PSYC 573 Characteristics and Needs of Exceptional Children (3-0-3), fall. A survey of the nature and needs of exceptional children, such as the mentally retarded, gifted, and emotionally disturbed.   

PSYC 574 Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Children (3-0-3), spring. A study of social and emotional problems in children and adolescents including intervention and prevention strategies. Same as SPED 574.   

PSYC 576 Psychology of Mental Retardation (3-0-3), fall. The nature and characteristics of mental retardation and its social, emotional, and cognitive aspects.   

PSYC 592 Child Psychology (3-0-3), fall. An advanced course in the study of children and adolescents, including physical, emotional, cognitive, moral, and social development.   

PSYC 608 School Psychology: Organization, Operations and Ethics (3-0-3), fall. This course introduces students to the field of school psychology. The history, systems, roles and functions of school psychologists are discussed. Readings in contemporary issues and historical events provide the foundation for graduate preparation in school psychology. Pre-practicum activities are required in order to obtain knowledge and experience about the organization and operation of schools.   

PSYC 610 Psychotherapy (3-2-3), fall. Studies the problems involved in diagnostic interviewing, case conceptualization, treatment planning, and evaluating treatment effectiveness. Develops specific skills in basic psychological intervention problems. Laboratory graded and credited with the course. Prerequisites: admission into the graduate program or consent of instructor.   

PSYC 611 Introduction to Research (3-0-3), spring. An introduction to research methods and their application to research problems.   

PSYC 612 Clinical Research Methods (3-0-3), fall. An emphasis on the conceptualization, design, completion, and evaluation of research in clinical, counseling, and school psychology. Attention is also given to philosophy of science, formulating questions in applied research, choosing appropriate statistical tests, and presenting results in a professional manner.   

PSYC 620 Group Psychotherapy (3-0-3), fall. Intended to provide training and exposure to techniques in group interventions. Reviews historical perspectives, popular treatment techniques, empirical evidence on treatment efficacy, ethical and legal issues, and integration considerations. Prerequisites: admission to a graduate psychology program required, PSYC 610.   

PSYC 624 Social and Cultural Bases of Behavior (3-0-3), spring. Study of classic and contemporary theories and empirical research of social and cultural foundations of behavior and their impact on the therapeutic relationship, competencies and standards, and culture specific knowledge. Emphasizing social cognition, stereotypes and prejudice, group processes, conformity, and gender/ethnic psychology.   

PSYC 625 Seminar in Intercultural Studies (3-0-3), spring. Observation and analysis of human behavior in small groups. Abstraction of taken-for-granted behavior patterns and fundamental psychological variables universal to such groups.   

PSYC 631 Human Life Cycle II (3-0-3), fall. Provides a thorough survey of the specified divisions of the life span from early adulthood, through middle adulthood and late adulthood to death. Same as GERO 631.   

PSYC 641 Behavioral Medicine (3-0-3), summer. The study of psychological factors that influence physical health and illness and the application of behavioral principles to the prevention and treatment of illness and the promotion of health.   

PSYC 642 Cognitive Assessment: Intelligence, Memory, and Achievement (3-0-3), fall, spring. An advanced study of the theory, principles, and practice of cognitive assessment. Substantial experience in administration, scoring, interpretation, and report-writing for the most commonly used cognitive assessment tools. Prerequisites: admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.   

PSYC 643 Personnel Assessment (3-0-3), spring. An overview of the role of assessment in industrial settings. Topics include need assessment, job analysis, personnel selection, interviewing, test selection, test reliability and validity, performance appraisal, ethical and legal issues in assessment, and interpretation of selected tests in employment settings. Prerequisite:PSYC 660, admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 644 Child and Adolescent Therapy (3-0-3), spring. Surveys psychotherapeutic approaches and techniques for child and adolescent problems. Survey conducted within a strong developmental framework. Emphasizes empirically supported psychotherapeutic programs for specific disorder presentations and conceptual skills necessary for effectively intervening with children, adolescents, and their parents. Prerequisite: admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 645 Child and Adolescent Assessment (3-0-3), fall. Advanced training in the use of psychological assessment instruments for the evaluation of children and adolescents experiencing emotional, behavioral, or academic problems. Preparation of evaluations, recommendations, and report writing for presentation of information to family and professionals is emphasized. Prerequisite: admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.   

PSYC 646 Child and Adolescent Development (3-0-3), spring. Overview of conceptual, theoretical, and methodological issues in the study of child and adolescent development in a lecture and seminar format. Coverage will include socio- emotional, biosocial, cognitive, and moral development.   

PSYC 647 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3-0-3), fall. Overview of conceptual and diagnostic issues in understanding children and adolescents who experience emotional and behavioral disorders. Emphasis on the development of diagnostic skills using the DSM and associated assessment strategies in clinical and school settings. Prerequisite: admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 648 Advanced Psychotherapeutic Techniques (3-0-3), on demand. Intense exposure to at least three currently-practiced techniques of psychotherapy. Discussion of theory, practice and research; demonstrations and observed student practice. Prerequisite:PSYC 610, admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 649 Behavioral Interventions (3-0-3), spring. Provides students with the knowledge and comprehension of the principles and procedures of behavior modification. In addition, the students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and modify inappropriate behaviors and evaluate intervention programs. Prerequisite: admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 650 Ethics and Issues in Professional Psychology (3-0-3), fall. An overview of the ethical and professional issues in applied psychological fields. Topics addressed include credentialing, ethical standards, legal considerations, professional development, and the role of personal beliefs and values in professional practice.   

PSYC 657 Multivariate Statistics (3-0-3), spring. An introduction to such topics as statistical inferences, sampling techniques, hypothesis testing, design of experiments, analysis of variance, special correlation methods, multiple prediction, and errors of measurement.   

PSYC 660 Clinical Assessment (3-0-3), spring. Theoretical issues and research in clinical assessment with special reference to administration and interpretation of testing procedures and clinical interviewing. Specific training with various methods of personality testing, behavioral assessment, and interviewing techniques. Prerequisite: admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.   

PSYC 664 Theory and Practice of Career Counseling (3-0-3), summer. A study of social, economic, and occupational information as related to helping relationships. It is designed to acquaint the student with the essential nature of such information in career decision making, job analysis, and its use in career counseling. Prerequisites: PSYC 610, PSYC 660, admission to a graduate psychology program required. Testing fee required.   

PSYC 668 Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience (3-0-3), fall. Develops a knowledge base in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and the conceptualization of human behavior (emotions, cognition, and executive systems) in a neurobiological context.   

PSYC 669 Human Learning and Cognition (3-0-3), fall. An overview of information processing theory as applied to human learning and cognition with application to assessment and intervention with individuals with disordered cognition.   

PSYC 670 Introduction to Neuropsychological Assessment (3-0-3), fall. Theory, research and practice related to the behavioral expression of brain dysfunction. Overview of selected neuropsychological instruments in current use and their clinical applications. Emphasis on a functional, hypothesis-testing approach and the integration of case history and test data to determine diagnostic indications and remedial prescriptions. Testing fee required.   

PSYC 676 Prevention, Intervention, and Advocacy in School Psychology (3-0-3), spring. Examines in a seminar setting specific issues that are involved in the practice of school psychology, specifically in the areas of prevention, intervention, and advocacy. Students will acquire familiarity with a broad range of techniques and gain competency in those techniques of particular relevance to their career goals.    Prerequisite: admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 681 Mental Health in the Workplace (3-0-3), summer. A review of abnormal psychology within the employment setting. The history and definitions of abnormal behavior, major theoretical models of abnormality, and the classification and assessment of mental disorders will be covered. Organizational context issues related to the evaluation of mental health problems will also be studied.   

PSYC 682 Advanced Psychopathology (3-0-3), spring. Review of theoretical and empirical literature definitions and systems of classifying deviant behavior patterns. Coverage of specific areas of pathology including situational reactions, emotional disorders, characterological disorders, substance abuse, chronic disorders, and family dysfunction. Instruction in purpose and use of contemporary diagnostic systems including the DSM.   

PSYC 688 Teams and Team Leadership (3-0-3), fall. Analysis of the factors contributing to success of teams in complex organizations, focusing on team selection, development, training, and evaluation. Students will develop skills through team-building and leading in simulations and team projects.   

PSYC 690 Practicum I (3-0-3), spring. Brings the student into a face-to-face relationship with a client under the supervision of the course instructor. Audio and visual devices will be used for supervision and observation by other students. A minimum of 160 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Prerequisite: PSYC 610 and consent of graduate advisor, admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 692 Practicum II (3-0-3), spring. Supervised practice in clinical psychology, including interviewing, assessment, therapy, report writing and staff participation. A variety of practicum settings is available. A minimum of 160 clock hours of supervised experience required. May be repeated. Prerequisites: PSYC 610, 650, 690, 660, 648, admission to a graduate psychology program required.   

PSYC 694 Practicum III (3-0-3), on demand. Supervised practice in psychology, including professional activities in clinical, counseling, school or industrial psychology. A variety of practicum settings are available. A minimum of 160 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Prerequisites: PSYC 645, 647, 649, 690.   

PSYC 695 School Psychology Internship (0-0-3), on demand. The opportunity to demonstrate, under conditions of appropriate supervision, the application of knowledge, development of skills for effective school psychological service delivery, and integration of competencies addressing professional preparation and practice. A minimum of 1200 clock hours required, with 600 in the public school setting. Prerequisite: Completion of all required course work for the specialist degree in School Psychology including: PSYC 608, 612, 624, 642, 644, 645, 646, 647, 649, 657, 668, 669, 676, 690, 694, SPED 577, 683, 685.   

PSYC 699 Master's Thesis (0-0-6).*

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