Residence Life Education

ACU Residence Life creates an unforgettable experience for our first- and second-year students. Our residence halls are a place of intentional student development, purposeful community, and excellent customer service. 

The Hall Experience

The Residence Life Education Curriculum walks our first- and second-year students through relevant topics that enhance their development during this important stage of life.

First Year [Explore]

Fall: Health and Wellness

First-year students have the opportunity to experience “Health and Wellness” in the Fall semester, which touches on topics such as physical well-being, alcohol awareness, and transition to college life.

Fall Overview:

        Total Programs: 284

Health and Wellness Programs: 158 | General Outcome Programs: 126

         Total Participation: 8,593 (Participants may have attended multiple programs)

         Total Budget Spent: 5,396

Average Program Cost: $19 | Average Program Attendance: 30 students

Programming Highlights:

            Fortitude:This resident workout takes place three times a week all around the ACU campus.  30+ men participated in this workout event every week.

           Lil’ Engine That Could:Program designed to help residents set goals for their academic, social, and spiritual life that are designed to maintain a positive balance.  RA follows up with participants regularly about their progress.

           Supersize Me:Residents from two freshman halls came together to watch this movie and discuss healthy habits.

           Pizza and Alcohol:RA created safe environment to have serious, candid discussions about alcohol use and abuse.  They talked through the biblical perspective of alcohol use.

           Coffee House Conversations:Two ACU faculty members came to the residence hall to discuss major topics, such as sex, baptism, and the will of God.

           Wellness Week Smoothies and Dunk Tank:Sophomore RDs hosted Smoothie Booth and Dunk Tank for all ACU students during Wellness Week to promote healthy eating habits and fun.

           Jam for Jesus:weekly worship time with residents to promote spiritual health and fellowship.

            

Fall 2008 Assessment Overview:

           Total Student Survey Responses: 128

Student Learning Outcomes Results:

[Results based on a Likert 6 point scale.]

Make a healthy and successful transition to the ACU campus community.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.9/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.7/6

Overall Student Average: 4.8/6

 

Better understand how their identity in Christ affects their personal choices about health and wellness.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.6/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.3/6

Overall Student Average: 4.5/6

 

Feel safe discussing topics such as alcohol use and body issues, and become more involved in conversations about these topics.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.7/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.6/6

Overall Student Average: 4.6/6

 

Develop a pattern of self-care and exhibit an ability to make informed choices about alcohol use, study habits, physical fitness, etc.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.6/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.2/6

Overall Student Average: 4.3/6

 

Spring 2009: Cultural Competency

Spring semester, the first-year students experience “Cultural Competency”.  This important semester helps them increase their understanding of themselves and others while expanding their worldview.  They have in-depth discussions with people from different cultures, religions, and races.  During this semester, they grow in their understanding of how to successfully navigate in today’s global society.

Spring Overview:

        Total Programs: 314

         Cultural Competency Programs: 135 | General Outcome Programs: 179

         Total Participation: 5, 528 (Participants may have attended multiple programs)

         Total Budget Spent: 8, 101

Average Program Cost: $26 | Average Program Attendance: 18 students

Programming Highlights:

            Global Prayer Initiative:Discussion and prayer with residents over various cultures around the world that are in need.

           Lord, Save Us From Your Followers movie and discussion:Watched movie and discussed the various perceptions our American culture has about Christians and Christianity. 

           Rwanda Forum:Collaborated with Bible department and Office of Spiritual Formation to discuss major issues dealt with in the Rwandan culture, in order to increase awareness, understanding, and sensitivity.

           Tae Kwon Doe:Two Korean student instructors came to teach residents Tae Kwon Doe and the history and traditions of Korean culture and the sport.

           Cultural Cuisine:Staff and students cooked dinner from a variety of international cultures and discussed the history of the culture and the food.

           African Dinner and a Movie:staff cooked a traditional African meal for resident and watched the movie “Sarifina” to depict political and cultural issues African has faced.

Spring 2009 Assessment Overview:

        Total Student Survey Responses: 271                                                                              

Student Learning Outcomes Results:

[Results based on a Likert 6 point scale.]

Grow in their understanding of diversity and appreciation of differences.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.9/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.8/6

Overall Student Average: 4.85/6

Understand role and responsibility on a global stage

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.6/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.2/6

Overall Student Average: 4.4/6

Gain understanding of personal worldview, values, attitudes, and perceptions.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.9/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.7/6

Overall Student Average: 4.8/6

Develop an attitude of embracing and respecting people and heritages different from their own.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.8/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.7/6

Overall Student Average: 4.75/6

Make informed decisions regarding personal treatment of those different from themselves, social actions, and community participation.

Freshman Student Average Results: 4.8/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 4.9/6

Overall Student Average: 4.85/6

Have open discussions in a safe, community-minded residential environment.

Freshman Student Average Results: 5.1/6

Sophomore Student Average Results: 5/6

Overall Student Average: 5.05/6

 

Second Year [Engage]

Fall: Identity [Sexuality | Gender]

Second-year students take a developmental step forward and dig into deeper issues during their time in the residence halls.  Fall semester, students experience “Identity”, where they begin to explore more of who they are and who they want to become. Sexuality and gender issues are also addressed during this challenging semester.

Student Learning Outcomes:

§ Explore personal and spiritual identity.

§ Develop an understanding of gender roles in leadership, church, campus community, and the global stage and gain an understanding of relevant sexuality and gender issues

§ Develop an understanding of healthy relationships, sexuality, and identity through a Christian worldview.

Hall Programming and Campus Collaboration Includes:

§ Christ-centered Identity

§ Sexuality

§ Gender Identity/Homosexuality

§ Women’s Roles

§ Healthy Relationships

§ Furthering “Explore!” Topics [Health and Wellness/Cultural Competency]

 

Fall 2009 Assessment  Overview:

            Assessment results available December 2009.

Student Evaluation Survey:

  1. I feel like my participation helped me better understand my personal identity related to issues of sexuality and gender.
  2. I feel like I better understand the perspectives and experiences of others in relation to the issues of identity, sexuality, and/or gender.
  3. I feel like I have a better understanding of gender roles, especially in areas of leadership, spirituality, and/or church community.
  4. I am better able to develop and maintain healthy relationships.
  5. I am better able to make informed, respectful choices in how I treat others who are different from me.
  6. I have gained insight into my personal spiritual identity and beliefs.
  7. I feel like I can ask questions and/or talk openly about difficult issues such as identity, sexuality, and/or gender with other students and staff in the hall.

 

Spring: Spiritual Formation

During the Spring semester, second-year students experience “Spiritual Formation” where they are able to discuss multiple faith perspectives and really begin to discover more about what they believe and why.  At the close of this semester, our students are able to enter their junior year equipped to become mature, confident leaders on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes:

§ Be introduced to different religions, faith approaches, and Kingdom voices.

§ Understand role and responsibility of Christians on a global stage.

§ Gain understanding of personal worldviews, values, attitudes, and perceptions of Christ, God, biblical foundations, and spiritual formation.

§ Develop an attitude of respecting religions and religious heritages, including those different from their own.

§ Make informed decisions regarding personal treatment of those with different faith perspectives.

Hall Programming and Campus Collaboration Includes:

§ Hearing a diverse chorus of voices as valid members of a greater community of voices

§ God, different religions, perspectives, views, etc.

§ Christ-centered leadership

§ Heritage, stereotypes, questions, etc.

§ Personal and community responsibilities surrounding spiritual formation

 

Spring 2010 Assessment  Overview:

            Assessment results available May 2010.

Student Evaluation Survey:

  1. I feel like my participation helped introduce me to diverse religious approaches and faith perspectives.
  2. I feel like I better understand the perspectives and experiences of peers in relation to the issues of religious differences and practices.
  3. I feel like I have a better understanding of my own values and perceptions of God, the Bible, and spiritual formation.
  4. I have an increased level of curiosity regarding various world religions and religious heritages.
  5. I am better able to make informed, respectful choices in how I treat others who are different from me.
  6. I feel like I can ask questions and/or talk openly about difficult issues such as spirituality and religion with other students and staff in the hall.