Pronoun Problems?

Students of FLGE111 and 112 at ACU: 
Okay, let's admit it; pronouns are a problem in every language. How many times have you been confused because you didn't know to whom a she/her/he/him/it referred (the antecedent)? Or how many times have you had a teacher write on your English essay "antecedent unclear"? Below you will find some examples of pronoun usage in German with English equivalents that I hope will help you sort out the problems. (Don't be expecting any prize-winning sentences.) Let me know what helps and what doesn't.

  1. Does the pronoun refer to a person or a thing?
  2. Just how many ways can "sie" be translated?
  3. Just how many ways can "ihr" be translated?

 

1. Does the pronoun refer to a person or a thing? 

Person in the nominative case—he, she, it, they

 

Thing in the nominative case—it, they

Der Mann ist mein Vater. Erspielt Tennis.
The man is my father. He plays tennis.

BUT

DerTisch muss weg.Erist kaputt.
The table has to go. It is broken.

Das Baby ist nicht hier. Es ist krank.
The baby is not here. He/she (the speaker must know) is sick. It (the speaker does not know) is sick.
Das Mädchen ist nicht hier. Es ist krank.
The girl is not here. She is sick.

BUT

Das Buch ist nicht hier. Es ist zu Hause.
The book is not here. It is at home.

Die Frau ist meine Schwester. Sie spielt Golf.
The woman is my sister. She plays golf.

BUT

Die Tür öffnet nicht. Sie ist kaputt.
The door won't open. It is broken.

Die Leute sind müde. Sie arbeiten den ganzen Tag.
The people are tired. They work all day.

BUT

Die Bücher sind nicht hier. Sie sind zu Hause.
The books are not here. They are at home.


Back to Top


2. Just how many ways can "sie" be translated? 

she (nom., sing.)Die Frau ist meine Schwester. Sie spielt Golf.
The woman is my sister. She plays golf.
it (nom., sing.)Die Tür öffnet nicht. Sie ist kaputt.
The door won't open. It is broken.
they (nom., pl.)Die Leute sind müde. Sie arbeiten den ganzen Tag.
The people are tired. They work all day.
Die Bücher sind nicht hier. Sie sind zu Hause.
The books are not here. They are at home.
her (acc., sing.)Wo ist Susan? Ich kann sie nicht sehen.
Where is Susan? I can't see her.
it (acc., sing.)Die Tür ist kaputt. Ich kann sie nicht öffnen.
The door is broken. I can't open it.
them (acc., pl.)Wo sind die Leute? Ich kann sie hören.
Where are the people? I can hear them.
Wo sind die Bücher? Ich kann sie nicht finden.
Where are the books? I can't find them.


At the beginning of the sentence, the "sie" is capitalized. Sie (can you hear the capital?) may mean any of these,


BUT


it may also mean "you." If it is capitalized anywhere in the sentence other than the first word, it has to mean "you."

you (formal, nom., sing. and pl.)

Herr Braun, Sie sind sehr willkommen.
Frau Braun, Sie sind auch sehr willkommen.
Herr und Frau Braun, Sie sind sehr willkommen.

you (formal, acc., sing. and pl.)

Herr Braun, der Arzt kann Sie jetzt sehen.
Frau Braun, der Arzt kann Sie jetzt sehen.
Herr und Frau Braun, der Arzt kann Sie jetzt sehen.


Back to Top

 

3. Just how many ways can "ihr" be translated? 

her (3d pers., dat., sing.)Ich rufe Petra an. Ich gehe gern mit ihr ins Kino.
I'll call Petra. I like to go to the movies with her.
Ich habe deine Mutter seit lange nicht gesehen. Wie geht es ihr?
I haven't seen your mother in a long time. How is she? (How goes it with her?)
Das Kleid steht ihr.
The dress looks good on her.
it (3d pers., dat., sing.) 
her (possessive)*Wo ist Marta? Ich habe ihr Buch. (Ich habe ihre Bücher.)
Where is Marta? I have her book. (I have her books.)
its (possessive)* 
their (possessive)Wo sind die Kinder? Ich habe ihr Essen. (Ich habe ihre Kleider.)
Where are the children? I have their food. (I have their clothes.)
you (informal, pl.)Kinder, ihr seid die erste hier.
Children, you are the first ones here.

*has the same endings as ein and mein
 

At the beginning of the sentence, the "ihr" is capitalized. Ihr (can you hear the capital?) may mean any of these,


BUT


it may also mean "your." If it is capitalized anywhere in the sentence other than the first word, it has to mean "your."

 

your (possessive, formal, sing. and pl.)*

Frau Braun, wo ist Ihr Sohn?
Herr Braun, wo ist Ihr Sohn?
Herr und Frau Braun, wo ist Ihr Sohn?
Wie geht es Ihrem Sohn?
Ich sehe Ihren Sohn nicht mehr.

*has the same endings as ein and mein

 

Back to Top