Roses in the garden near the Hardin Administration building on the ACU campus

Bee Campus Pollinator Plants

Making the World Safer For Pollinators, One Campus At A Time

Abilene Christian University is committed to providing native, perennial landscaping that will attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds to our campus for the purpose of conservation and education. These areas benefit both pollinators and our students in providing a calming place to reconnect with nature. We hope you enjoy our beautiful campus.

Bee with pink flowers

Pollinator Plant Fun Facts

Gregg's Blue Mistflower

Gregg's Blue Mistflower

Eupatorium greggi

Native to Texas, this mistflower was named after Josiah Gregg, who documented his travels on a botanical expedition and sent his specimens to the famous botanist, George Engelmen. The American Botanical Society added “greggi” to the scientific names of 23 of his findings in his honor.

Augusta Duelberg Salvia

Augusta Duelberg Salvia

Salvia farinacea

Native to Texas, this disease and pest resistant salvia was found by Texas horticulturist, Greg Grant. It was on the gravesite of Augusta Duelberg, who died in 1905, and therefore, named after her. 

May Night Salvia

Salvia sylvestris

This perennial sage blooms from May until August. Butterflies and bees love this pungent smelling plant. Its scientific name comes from 'salveo' meaning 'to heal' and 'sylvestris' pertaining to forests.

Hot Lips Salvia

'Hot Lips' Salvia

Salvia microphylla

This plant gets its name from the flowers that, upon inspection, look like a pair of puckered red lips on a white background.

Limerock Ruby and Mercury Rising Tickseeds

'Mercury Rising' Tickseed

Coreopsis

Native to Texas, this cultivar spreads by rhizomes that may be divided in the spring. The name tickseed comes from the seeds, which literally look like a cluster of ticks.

'Summer Pastel' Yarrow

‘Summer Pastel’ Yarrow

Achillea millefolium

Native to North America, Europe, and Asia, the yarrow thrives in moderate temperatures. It is attractive to many species of wasps, butterflies, moths and other insects. It has astringent properties and Native Americans used it for pain relief for headaches, toothaches and earaches.

Autumn Sage ‘Moonlight’

Salvia greggi

Native to Texas, this plant has been cultivated to come in many colors. This is one of many plants named for its founder, Josiah Gregg, on his botanical expedition in 1848.

Flame Acanthus

Flame Acanthus

Anisacanthus quadrifidus

Native to Texas and Mexico, this plant is also known as Wright’s honeysuckle and is named for Charles Wright who first collected samples of it in the 19th Century.

Angelita 'Four Nerve' Daisy

Angelita ‘Four Nerve’ Daisy

Tetraneuris acaulis

Native to North America, this daisy is a member of the sunflower family. The Hopi Indians used is as a stimulating drink and as a poultice on pregnant women for back and hip pain.

Tropical Milkweed

Tropical Milkweed

Asclepias curassavica

Native to the American tropics, this milkweed is a favorite for Monarch butterflies. They lay eggs and caterpillars feed on them. The sap of the milkweed, however, can cause eye injuries.

Prairie Coneflower 'Cheyenne Spirit'

Prairie Coneflower ‘Cheyenne Spirit’

Echinacea

Native to North America and as a member of the sunflower family, this coneflower is a cultivar of purpurea Purple Coneflower, but provides us with many more color options like orange, yellow and red.

Autumn Sage 'Sierra Pink'

Autumn Sage ‘Sierra Pink’

Salvia greggi

Native to Texas, this salvia is valued for its adaptability to garden soils, very long blooming season, and as a magnet for hummingbirds. It is also one of the many plants named for Josiah Gregg.

Dwarf Mexican Petunia 'Katie'

Dwarf Mexican Petunia ‘Katie’

Ruellia brittoniana

Native to Mexico, this small shrubby plant has white, pink or more commonly purple flowers. Bees and hummingbirds find them irresistible, and these plants can be very invasive.

Fall Aster

Fall Aster

Symphotricum oblongifolium

Native to North America, this is also called Aromatic Aster. It is a favorite of bees and butterflies and blooms in late summer and fall.

Mealycup Sage

Mealycup Sage

Salvia farinacea

Not as tall as the Augusta or Henry Duelberg salvias, this one has darker purple, spiky flowers. It is also very attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.

Lavender 'Phenomenal'

Lavender 'Phenomenal'

Lavendula intermedia

This is one of the hardiest lavenders in the US and Europe. Lavender is prized for its oil that is used for calming and soothing.

Yucca 'Brakelights Red'

Yucca ‘Brakelights Red’

Hesperaloe parviflora

Native to Texas and Mexico, the yucca is heat resistant and drought tolerant. Hummingbirds are drawn to its bright red flowers.

Turk's Cap

Turk's Cap

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii

Native to the southeastern United States, this flower gets its name from the shape of the turban-like bloom. Hummingbirds are very drawn to its red color. The Turk’s Cap is the primary host of the White Skipper, a small butterfly.

Texas Gold Columbine

Texas Gold Columbine

Achilegia chrysantha ‘Hinkleyana’

Native to Texas, this is the most heat tolerant of all the columbines. It is also an early bloomer, likes the shade, and has beautiful yellow flowers with lacy foliage.

Mexican Feather Grass

Mexican Feather Grass

Nassella tenuissima

Native to southwestern United States and Mexico, this can be a nuisance grass to sheep breeders because the needlelike seeds stick in the wool.

Autumn Sage 'Navajo White'

Salvia greggi

Native to Texas, this semi-evergreen and drought tolerant plant is very tough. It comes in a wide variety of colors: pale yellow, orange, salmon, fuchsia, purple, red, burgundy, and some with white variegation of leaves or flowers are commonly available. This plant is also named for its founder Josiah Gregg.

Cast Iron Plant

Cast Iron Plant

Aspidistra elatior

Native to China, this plant is a member of the Asparagus family and is named for its ability to handle a great deal of cultural abuse. It grows readily in the shade but may die back to the roots during a hard freeze. It is also normally grown as a houseplant.

Henry Duelberg Salvia

Henry Duelberg Salvia

Salvia farinacea

Native to Texas, this variety of salvia was also named for the gravesite where the plant was found. Texas Horticulturist, Greg Grant, found it on Henry Duelberg's grave, who died in 1935.